Rub a dub dub

A church, and old house taking a faceplant, and a tub.  I guess that completes my checklist.

If that was a toilet, it’d be gross…but since it’s a tub, I guess it’s amusing!  If it was a kitchen sink, that’d leave room for one more cliche’.

Adjacent to that first photo, but deserving of its own color treatment, is this old house…complete with its on backyard tub.

One of the things I love about old homesteads and farmsteads is the way they evoke images of what they must have looked like when brand new, or when home to a family, or on the day they were left behind.  Sometimes they also make one wonder…why and by whom were these bathtubs so strategically placed?

One of the better barns

I absolutely love this structure.  I even had some decent conditions in which to photograph it.  There was some sort of farm implement parked incredibly close to it, but from the right angle I could avoid all that.  This barn almost looks like it’s half elevator, half barn!

Uh oh. I knew this would happen

You’re probably familiar with the St. John’s Church up in Arena, North Dakota. Well, it’s time to pay it a visit as soon as you can; it is unlikely to remain intact for much longer.  If you know what to look for you can see in the photo above.

 

The block foundation has collapsed on both sides, but that’s nothing new; it’s been like that for a couple of years.  But the back has collapsed as well, causing these support beams to shift and tilt backward.  They have been the only thing keeping the church from collapse.

 

As you can see, the entire church has settled backward and the front section is beginning to pull away from the main structure.  That means the entryway and steeple may not last much longer.

 

Seriously.  Once this settles back far enough and the beams give away, it’s all over.  If you have never seen this church before, now’s your time.  If you’re familiar with it, better pay it a visit before the inevitable occurs. I’ve got a fond connection with this place, and it’s going to be heartbreaking to see it go…but the clock is ticking.

Left the hood open

It’s been a while since I’ve been in the right place at the right time with the sunset and an old farmstead.  Now that the kids are old enough, it’s time to take them (and their new cameras) with me.  Sometimes an old farm will have a surprise, like an old car or tractor, to add to the mystique.  In this case, all the ingredients came together quite nicely.  And I needed it; I’ve been a bit of a workaholic lately.

Grand

I don’t know why it struck me the way it did, but I suddenly found myself marveling at how large this barn is.  It must have been quite an undertaking to build it, and I bet it was a fantastic asset when this Fallen Farm was operating in its heyday.  That’s the sort of thing that, on its most basic level, enthrals so many people when they see old buildings in decay.

It’s a neat journey to imagine what the structures must have been like when they were a home, a business, and a way of life.  It’s remarkable what it must have taken to build them way back then, to get the materials and labor to a remote location and construct something that people would later drive by and photograph.  It’s nice to wonder how the mundane had become so enchanting over the years and even generations.  And, of course, to wonder how many lives had been affected by these buildings.

 

Finally, there’s the wistful realization that these structures don’t have much time left.  Many of my favorite Fallen Farms are no longer in existence.  Maybe later this year I’ll feature a few.

On the wagon

This wagon was an unexpected find last weekend, and one of my favorite rainy day photos.  Actually, considering I had a very short window of time in which to operate, I had a very profitable day from a photo hobbyist standpoint!

Speaking of “on the wagon”, I have been abstaining from drinking pop for eight months now.  I sleep better, and I know it’s better for me.  I’ve had an appetite spike since ditching caffeinated fizzy stuff, so I have to be careful of that.  Headaches have diminished, though, and my wife is happy. But drinking water is so boring!