Got a bit of an overbite there

I’d seen a photo of this home posted online and knew I had to find it.  A lot of Google hunting based on a description with the posted photo gave me what I needed to load up the truck and venture off to the northeast.  I marked six or seven spots that looked promising from space, then proceeded to hunt them all down.  This was the last spot on my list, and it didn’t disappoint.

 

I’m sure you spotted the same feature about this house that I did: the overhang of the upper floor, no longer supported by columns to the deck below.  I’m sure it’s just a matter of time before this collapses, but for now it has a great visage.

 

Before long, the sun departed behind me and I had to head home and pressure wash a LOT of sticky mud from my truck.  But this home holds a lot of promise, so you can be sure I plan to check in on it from time to time.

Joe’s garage

Okay, I don’t know if the owner’s name is Joe…but I struggled to come up with a title for this post.

The big question is…what are they trying to prevent from escaping?  All the doors are barricaded from the outside. >gasp<

An hour well spent

I managed to sneak out for an hour or so with my cameras this weekend, and decided to head out to a spot which I’ve been eyeing for a long time.  I’ve actually roamed within a couple of miles of this place on multiple other occasions, so it’s been a little frustrating that I’ve never made it to this location.  But that frustration has ended now.

 

I originally thought this was a barn, having viewed it from a distance…but that was based on the roof line.  Obviously that isn’t the case.  It sure is a unique little house!

I found some other cool stuff in the area, which I’ll post later.  I’m still cleaning mud off my truck.  Something about section lines after two or three days of rain and slushy snow that tends to introduce a lot of sticky mud into one’s life.

How firm a foundation

I jetted out west early in the morning to take a photo of this little building near a friend’s farm.  It wasn’t until I looked at the photos that I saw the bottom of the building.  Looks like the foundation is a little lacking.  That would explain its sagging.  Unfortunately, once a building starts to bow like this I think the clock starts ticking.  The big barn nearby has already succumbed to the ravages of time.

Gloomy hut

I took the kiddos duck hunting a while back and stopped in the small town of Denhoff to check it out.  I saw this quaint little building and thought I’d snap a quick shot.  Didn’t do much else for photography that day, or much at all recently, as I’ve been so busy and the weather hasn’t exactly been great.  I know there are plenty of opportunities out there, but right now I’m just so stacked I don’t know if I’ll be out there to snatch them.

Rub a dub dub

A church, and old house taking a faceplant, and a tub.  I guess that completes my checklist.

If that was a toilet, it’d be gross…but since it’s a tub, I guess it’s amusing!  If it was a kitchen sink, that’d leave room for one more cliche’.

Adjacent to that first photo, but deserving of its own color treatment, is this old house…complete with its on backyard tub.

One of the things I love about old homesteads and farmsteads is the way they evoke images of what they must have looked like when brand new, or when home to a family, or on the day they were left behind.  Sometimes they also make one wonder…why and by whom were these bathtubs so strategically placed?

One of the better barns

I absolutely love this structure.  I even had some decent conditions in which to photograph it.  There was some sort of farm implement parked incredibly close to it, but from the right angle I could avoid all that.  This barn almost looks like it’s half elevator, half barn!

Uh oh. I knew this would happen

You’re probably familiar with the St. John’s Church up in Arena, North Dakota. Well, it’s time to pay it a visit as soon as you can; it is unlikely to remain intact for much longer.  If you know what to look for you can see in the photo above.

 

The block foundation has collapsed on both sides, but that’s nothing new; it’s been like that for a couple of years.  But the back has collapsed as well, causing these support beams to shift and tilt backward.  They have been the only thing keeping the church from collapse.

 

As you can see, the entire church has settled backward and the front section is beginning to pull away from the main structure.  That means the entryway and steeple may not last much longer.

 

Seriously.  Once this settles back far enough and the beams give away, it’s all over.  If you have never seen this church before, now’s your time.  If you’re familiar with it, better pay it a visit before the inevitable occurs. I’ve got a fond connection with this place, and it’s going to be heartbreaking to see it go…but the clock is ticking.

Left the hood open

It’s been a while since I’ve been in the right place at the right time with the sunset and an old farmstead.  Now that the kids are old enough, it’s time to take them (and their new cameras) with me.  Sometimes an old farm will have a surprise, like an old car or tractor, to add to the mystique.  In this case, all the ingredients came together quite nicely.  And I needed it; I’ve been a bit of a workaholic lately.