A different corner

Yeah, that’s a song title reference I never thought I’d make.  This old corner is on a shuttered school house that my wife and I encountered on a recent photo journey.  The kids were at camp, so we got to run around with cameras until midnight!  Ain’t love grand?

 

This is the old school house.  The corner is on the left of this photo.  We were actually just getting started when we came across this building, and it was the beginning of a very fruitful photography day.

I’m guessing it’ll take me into winter to start processing the photos I’ve been able to acquire over the summer.  I’d had some dry spells in recent memory, but this summer made up for everything.  I doubt I’ll be as busy this winter as last, so there will be plenty of time to share new images!

Heat haze

Here are a couple more shots from Friday, when I didn’t let the haze of smoke from fires in Montana, Canada, et cetera get in the way of a great photo day.  I’m actually starting to like the drab background it provides, without any cloud distractions and the change to the color cast of the light in the foreground.

 

Take this shot, for example.  I was going to post it later on its own with something about “leaning” in the title, but it is actually a great example of the diffused light provided by the haze.  And, just like a previous photo, the color of the otherwise drab building stands out against the gray background better than a brilliant September blue.

More to come!  I went out thinking the light was giong to kill any chance of good photos but came home with a whole pack of candidates.

Oh yeah…the post title comes from this dreamy song by Walls… a wonderful little instrumental track just perfect for roaming the North Dakota countryside.

Like Golden Swirls

I’m naturally attracted to various “fallen farms”, but sometimes they surprise me with something else nearby that catches my eye.  This wheat field, for instance, had some really cool geometry.  The way the rows curved along the hill and around this old house was really neat, so I figured I’d try a few angles.

 

The swirls actually kinda remind me of when I was doing tile installation, as my glue pattern would have little swaths like this.

 

Gold and blue always go well together, don’t you think?  Throw in the remains of this farmstead for accent, and you’ve got a pretty straightforward photo opportunity.

 

As much as I liked the colors, I decided to go all monochrome for a second and do this angle.  I’ve traveled past this particular photo spot numerous times, but I’m glad I finally stopped and investigated this time around.

On a curve

I caught this Fallen Farm structure out of the corner of my eye in a spot where I thought I’d already found all there is to see.  I got a chance to revisit a lot of familiar photography territory lately, places rich in waypoints on my GPS, and there were plenty of pleasant surprises.  This is the first one I get to share with you.

A hut with a view

I’m not talking about Pizza Hut, Jabba the Hutt, or even the hut one of Barack Obama’s more famous half-brothers lives in.  This little structure (and the shelter/cellar behind it) caught my eye the other day, and I couldn’t have asked for a nicer summer sky for a backdrop.  The water in the backyard didn’t hurt, either.

Lean into it

No, I’m not talking about the album by Mr. Big.  I’m talking about a couple of wooden structures I discovered on Friday’s photo trip.  This first shot was pretty cool, with a little bit of everything contained within a gap in the tree rows.

 

This building actually looks like it’s leaning uphill, although it sits on level ground.  I can’t help but wonder how long it’s had this angle, or how long it’ll continue to stay upright.  I’ve kept an eye on other small structures like this, and none still remain upright.  So it’s best to get out there and photograph them while they’re still around!

Some settling may occur

I’ve been wanting a photo of this old barn along Highway 36 for quite some time, and last weekend I was able to take the opportunity.  I was buzzing around in the area and came upon this site, and had just enough time to take a few photos before jetting to the next location according to my timetable.

I had spent some time in Wilton but, due to my schedule, I did not check on a more famous falling barn: the one northwest of town along Highway 83.  I’ll get back to that one another time.

That house on the hill

If you’re trying to figure out a music-lyric reference for the title of this post, I have to admit it exists.  The phrase jumped into my subconscious from Fleetwood Mac’s “Big Love”.  Wow.  That one was buried deep.

 

This little farm sits on a hill overlooking a pretty darn rural vista.  No power lines.  None of those horrible subsidy-sucking wind turbines. Even the road is a long, long ways away.  Perfect, as far as I’m concerned.  And what a beautiful sunny day for a photo!

Mangled

This windmill caught my attention while I was out roaming recently, and – unlike many of the windmills I encounter – it was actually near the road so I could quickly get a nice photo of it.  It seems these things are vanishing at a quickening pace; even ol’ standbys are falling to the ravages of time and North Dakota weather.

 

This one actually sits in a yard along with an old farmstead.  There are cattle on the land, which is probably why the lawn appears to be mowed.  It’s sad to see another casualty of time here, but fascinating nonetheless.

Pause for effect

arena_car_DJI_0334-8_hdrI love HDR (High Dynamic Range) photography when done judiciously.  It’s the kind of thing that can bring out all kinds of delicious detail in both the highlights and shadows of a photo, and that’s what I like to go for.  That hyper-realistic look really pleases my eye.  Unfortunately, HDR processing techniques are often done in such a heavy-handed fashion that they end up looking like grainy, over-saturated paintings.  Those I do not like one bit.

I opted to go a little further toward the artistic side with this particular photo, just because I liked the effect in this particular case.  It’s pushed a little past hyper-realistic detail into a more stylized realm, but in this case I think that works.  Not too keen on some of the blooming where dark areas meet light, but much of that is actually because of the way the sky was that day.

How about you?  Do you like extra realism, or surreal style?